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Leonard Bernstein Place

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Yesterday, October 14, marked the anniversary of the passing of one of America’s greatest musical talents: Leonard Bernstein. The legendary conductor led the first concert ever at Lincoln Center, with the New York Philharmonic (nyphil) at Philharmonic Hall (now called Avery Fisher Hall) in 1962. Today, the intersection of Broadway, Columbus Avenue and West 65th Street, at the corner of Avery Fisher Hall, is named in his honor.

You know you’re addicted to music when:
++ You can spot a Baroque chord progression in pretty much every folk rock song from the 60s.++ Someone stops a piece of music midway through, and it sounds like fingernails on a chalkboard.++ You have your wedding and your funeral playlists sorted, and you’re only 22.++ You know that the Men In Black tune is a sample from Patrice Rushen’s 1982 song Forget Me Nots.++ You immediately change the radio station when you get in someone else’s car.++ You make a road trip playlist every time you have to drive somewhere that takes longer than 15 minutes.++ You can whistle pitch perfectly, and with trills.++ You relate everything you spend money on back to how much it would cost in cds/vinyl/downloads.++ You can guess the name of a piece of music after hearing the first note - and you’re always right.++ Your team always wins music trivia.++ You only date musicians.++ You were born in in the 90s but you know what stylus is.++ You hang around outside McDonald’s in Mt Annan so you can hear classical music on a loud speaker.
++ You have anxiety dreams about whether to file your music collection alphabetically or alphabetically within genre.

You know you’re addicted to music when:

++ You can spot a Baroque chord progression in pretty much every folk rock song from the 60s.

++ Someone stops a piece of music midway through, and it sounds like fingernails on a chalkboard.

++ You have your wedding and your funeral playlists sorted, and you’re only 22.

++ You know that the Men In Black tune is a sample from Patrice Rushen’s 1982 song
Forget Me Nots.

++ You immediately change the radio station when you get in someone else’s car.

++ You make a road trip playlist every time you have to drive somewhere that takes longer than 15 minutes.

++ You can whistle pitch perfectly, and with trills.

++ You relate everything you spend money on back to how much it would cost in cds/vinyl/downloads.

++ You can guess the name of a piece of music after hearing the first note - and you’re always right.

++ Your team always wins music trivia.

++ You only date musicians.

++ You were born in in the 90s but you know what stylus is.

++ You hang around outside McDonald’s in Mt Annan so you can hear classical music on a loud speaker.

++ You have anxiety dreams about whether to file your music collection alphabetically or alphabetically within genre.

We know you love our Tumblr feed, but are you listening to our classical music stream? 
http://www.abc.net.au/radio/player/beta/#live/classic2 
At Classic 2 it doesn’t matter if you know your concertos from your cantatas. Our stream is all about listening for sheer pleasure. You can talk through performances, leave your mobile phone on, and applaud whenever you want! We aim to showcase Australia’s best classical musicians and composers and put names to familiar tunes. Streaming all day, every day of the year, Classic 2 lets the music do the talking. Listen online or via the ABC radio mobile app.
We are Classic 2.

We know you love our Tumblr feed, but are you listening to our classical music stream? 

http://www.abc.net.au/radio/player/beta/#live/classic2 

At Classic 2 it doesn’t matter if you know your concertos from your cantatas. Our stream is all about listening for sheer pleasure. You can talk through performances, leave your mobile phone on, and applaud whenever you want! 

We aim to showcase Australia’s best classical musicians and composers and put names to familiar tunes. 

Streaming all day, every day of the year, Classic 2 lets the music do the talking. Listen online or via the ABC radio mobile app.

We are Classic 2.

Out of tune. ALL THE PIANOS.
All pianos are tuned to a particular system that is by definition out of tune!
The ancient Greeks invented a series of scales we call modes. Two of these scales came to be ubiquitous in western music, now known as the major and minor scales.
The tuning of these scales was arrived at by using simple ratios of frequencies to produce pure-sounding intervals. For example, by taking a string and dividing it in half, you get a note an octave higher than the original. Using two-thirds the length produces a perfect fifth. These are universally acknowledged as the most stable, ‘pleasing’ intervals. They are low down in the harmonic series, and occur in nature all the time.
Everyone who’s played guitar or piano knows that taking the perfect fifth interval and stacking it on top of itself 12 times (the cycle of fifths) brings you back to where you started and covers all 12 notes in the octave. Right?
Not quite! If you use the correct, pure ratio to tune your fifths, you will arrive at a note slightly too high.
This isn’t intuitive. Shouldn’t the physics of sound be more elegant? Well, it is, but only by looking at it the problem other way around: the idea that the octave should be easily divisible into 12 equal parts turns out to be totally arbitrary. There is nothing special or elegant about the semitone. 
The idea of 12 notes in an octave is a much later innovation than the original Greek modes. When keyboard instruments were invented it became useful to give them extra keys so that music could be played in several different closely-related keys, and be able to modulate between them with a single piece.
Equal temperament was a clever innovation during the Baroque era that enabled music in 12 different major and minor keys to be possible without re-tuning the instrument. This was (and still is) done by tuning all of the perfect fifths slightly narrower than their proper two-thirds ratio. It’s barely noticeable, but it does mean that when you play a perfect fifth on a perfectly tuned piano it doesn’t buzz the way it would on a violin or between two singers.
So there it is. The musical scales that we associate so strongly with ’tunefulness’ are little more than accidents of history.

Out of tune. ALL THE PIANOS.

All pianos are tuned to a particular system that is by definition out of tune!

The ancient Greeks invented a series of scales we call modes. Two of these scales came to be ubiquitous in western music, now known as the major and minor scales.

The tuning of these scales was arrived at by using simple ratios of frequencies to produce pure-sounding intervals. For example, by taking a string and dividing it in half, you get a note an octave higher than the original. Using two-thirds the length produces a perfect fifth. These are universally acknowledged as the most stable, ‘pleasing’ intervals. They are low down in the harmonic series, and occur in nature all the time.

Everyone who’s played guitar or piano knows that taking the perfect fifth interval and stacking it on top of itself 12 times (the cycle of fifths) brings you back to where you started and covers all 12 notes in the octave. Right?

Not quite! If you use the correct, pure ratio to tune your fifths, you will arrive at a note slightly too high.

This isn’t intuitive. Shouldn’t the physics of sound be more elegant? Well, it is, but only by looking at it the problem other way around: the idea that the octave should be easily divisible into 12 equal parts turns out to be totally arbitrary. There is nothing special or elegant about the semitone.

The idea of 12 notes in an octave is a much later innovation than the original Greek modes. When keyboard instruments were invented it became useful to give them extra keys so that music could be played in several different closely-related keys, and be able to modulate between them with a single piece.

Equal temperament was a clever innovation during the Baroque era that enabled music in 12 different major and minor keys to be possible without re-tuning the instrument. This was (and still is) done by tuning all of the perfect fifths slightly narrower than their proper two-thirds ratio. It’s barely noticeable, but it does mean that when you play a perfect fifth on a perfectly tuned piano it doesn’t buzz the way it would on a violin or between two singers.

So there it is. The musical scales that we associate so strongly with ’tunefulness’ are little more than accidents of history.

Win a double-pass to ‘Road Trip’ at Melbourne Festival

And join us on a sonic adventure with Aurora Orchestra and Katie Noonan

We’ve partnered with the Melbourne Festival and Aurora Orchestra to offer three lucky winners each a double-pass to the Australian premiere of Road Trip and Aurora Orchestra’s highly-anticipated debut on our shores.

Guided by the belief that orchestral music should be accessible and relevant to the broadest audience possible, Aurora’s performances frequently extend beyond the usual confines of the concert hall. In this eclectic sonic journey, the British chamber orchestra team up with guest vocalist Katie Noonan for a folk-tinged tour through the dusty back roads of America.

Hailed by The Australian as “a rare talent with a voice of extraordinary beauty and versatility”, two of singer-songwriter Katie Noonan’s original works will be included in the repertoire, alongside music from Paul Simon and newly commissioned folk songs by Nico Muhly.

Inspired by the ghost of Jack Kerouac, Road Trip is a sonic adventure that takes its audience across the sweeping plains of America – as seen by some of its greatest composers; from the vibrantly surreal palette of John Adams’ cartoon-inspired Chamber Symphony, to Copland’s vision of rural Appalachia.

For your chance to win one of three double-passes, fill in the form below using the header: Road Trip Competition, and tell us in 30 words or fewer, what music makes up your ultimate road trip soundtrack.

Presented by Melbourne Festival and Monash University Academy of Performing Arts, the event takes place at the Monash University Clayton Campus Robert Blackwood Hall on Sunday 26 October at 7pm.

*Competition open to residents of Australia only. Travel is at the winner’s own expense. Competition opens at 5pm  AEDT Wednesday 15 October and closes 9am AEDT Tuesday 21 October 2014. Winners will be notified by email on the closing date. Click here to download full T&Cs

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Welcome to our new talk-free classical music stream.

You can listen online by launching the radio player, or by choosing the Classic 2 icon on your ABC Radio app. Stick around for a different perspective on classical - you might be surprised.

ABC Classic 2. Simply classical.